Archives For ubuntu

Spotify is an amazing music service with awesome Linux support … except they never included proper media key support.

Here’s how to make Spotify Linux respond to both Gnome Media Keys and custom media key settings from anywhere!

Continue Reading…

I love Trine 2 as much as the next guy, though technologically speaking there are some issues. Just check the forums and you’ll know what I mean. Thankfully though I only came across one issue, and that’s where when playing, no matter what resolution or graphics settings, there is always serious lag in some areas and the audio constantly stutters, pops and lags. It really sucks since that makes it barely playable, actually after about 10 minutes it’s completely unplayable.

So what could be the issue? Well, it’s not as simple as we thought. Let’s take a look at why this happens first, then I’ll give you the solution.
Continue Reading…

The Creative X-FI Titanium card has, for a long time, not worked on Ubuntu … until now. I’ve gathered what information I could and found a solution to get it working 100% of the time. This doesn’t mean it works to 100% of it’s potential; some features are still missing such as the Crystalizer and fun features like that. Though it does record audio well, processes extremely well and with my help you’ll have it blasting at full 5.1 digital goodness.
Continue Reading…

So you downloaded the handy-dandy Kubuntu Live CD to play around with. YEY! But for some reason it won’t display any graphics on your monitor. You might get: pixelated images, distorted views, a blank screen or even a blinking LCD power button. Oh yey … kinda screwed there because you can’t even get INTO the boot cd in-order to maybe change the video settings or install updated drivers.

Fear not! There is a solution … or two!

Continue Reading...

XBMC 9.11: Camelot Finally Out! XBMC has finally hit it’s latest milestone release: 9.11 Camelot. This release marks a great step forward in the media world. Why? Because this release offers plenty of space to create plugins, skins and plenty more.

If you are using Ubuntu or any variant of it, you will already have the update ready in your repository. Simply update the source list and upgrade. In Kubuntu, KpackageIt should handle it nicely. If you don’t have it installed yet, head over to XBMC’s download page to get it.

Here are some of the highlighted updates in this milestone release:

  • Improved skin framework
  • Better support for multi-monitor displays
  • Updated FFmpeg libraries
  • Added Flash support
  • UPnP support
  • Updated and added a lot of scrapers for music and movie information

There are more changes of course, you can read all about this release at their blog here. Also, don’t forget to head to the skinning page to download our choice of great skins here.  Plugins are also essential so grab some good ones here.

Install TweetDeck in Ubuntu Karmic x64 Easily TweetDeck is a favorite Twitter application of many users. Why? Because of it’s grouping features, functionality, customizability, great looks and it runs on just about any major OS.

For us linux users, there is a version which you can pick up from TweetDeck.com. Though, to my dismay, you need to install the Adobe AIR plugin first. This is done rather automatically so it’s not much of a hassle, but it still is rather annoying and I would rather have the ability to install via apt or a .deb file. So in-order to install TweetDeck on Linux you not only need Adobe Air, but also Flash; and we all know how fun that is.

After downloading from the “Download Now” flash button, it will install TweetDeck and launch it if you want. This will work fine. The problem is if you want to start it up by yourself. You might get this error:

Error loading the runtime (libadobecertstore.so: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory)

Even if you find “libadobecertstore.so” on your computer you will still get that error. The reason is simple. TweetDeck is a 32 bit application and if you are using a 64bit Ubuntu, it will use the 32 bit libraries that you installed. From this post on OssRamblings, they describe all the lib32 steps you need to take. But if you’re a regular user of x64 bit Ubuntu you probably have installed a lot those anyway.

So all you probably really need to do is this:

sudo cp /usr/lib/libadobecertstore.so /usr/lib32

And that’s it. This should be done after installing Adobe Air. Also, just for good measure do “sudo ldconfig” to reload the libraries.

Automatically Add XBMC To Your Ubuntu Repository List A few people been wondering how to easily enable or install XBMC on Ubuntu. It’s rather easy and I have said how to do it before. BUT Ubuntu Karmic makes life a bit easier if the repository used the PPA system.

The old way to add a repository to your source list was to go through the command line or through your favorite gui tool. Through there you had to add the full path to the repository and then add the security key. Now things are simpler:

From the command line you only have to enter this one command and it will take care of everything for you:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:team-xbmc/ppa

And … that’s it. It will add the correct repository for you and add the security key. Fun! After you add the repo, don’t forget to update:

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get -u dist-upgrade

With this you’ll get all the latest and greatest XBMC updates to your front door and no more security issues! Hurray.

edit: You can access information about the team-xbmc ppa here.

edit2: Also more info about PPA’s and XBMC in the PPA’s here at the XBMC forum.

XBMC Beta 2 Now In Kubuntu Karmic Repos! Rejoice! The newest latest and greatest version of XBMC is almost out. Their latest release, which hit the repo’s early today morning (for you us in the EU) or late last night for ya’ll back West, is the Beta 2 release.

What is in this glorious Beta 2 release? Well, just like in the Beta 1, it uses (or at least has) their newest theme called “Confluence”. They report that they have fixed around 200 new bugs, a few of which are just some translation fixed and very minor things. But non-the-less 200 in such a short time is great.

Should you upgrade? Oh yes. Why? Because since they started on Beta 1 the XBMC crew as been working tirelessly on bug fixes. Since the release of Beta 2 they have stopped (“frozen” as they call it) any development of new features. So they are no focusing on ironing out the wrinkles.

Update: XBMC 9.11 Camelot FINAL is now out. Read all about it here.

Directly from their page:

As always, head on over to the download page for the latest and greatest. The Ubuntu PPAs will be updated soon. Give it a go, and be sure to submit quality bug reports if you have any issues. Also, please keep great the translations coming!

Be sure to test it out and let them know if anything goes wrong. IF you are using it be aware that it IS beta software (testing stage software) so it can randomly die on you. Though, from my experience so far with Beta 1 and now Beta 2 it is rather darn stable.

So, if you have Ubuntu or any *buntu for that matter, you can get it from the PPA’s. For me, the updated are ‘blocked’ through KPackageIt, so if you have a similar situation just update from the command line by doing:

sudo apt-get -u dist-upgrade

If you don’t have the PPA’s added, you can read about how to add them here: XMBC 9.11 In Ubuntu Karmic Repositories.

One thing I recommend you check out / do … is go get yourself some plugings and extentions installed in XBMC. There are some pretty cool toys to be had. Though, that is also one thing the XBMC people have to fix. The plugin installer ‘thing’ isn’t ready yet. It has a few issues, nothing major. Mostly cosmetic and information issues, but everything will install just fine as long as it’s marked compatible (or the like).